March 7, 2004

Kennedy on Iraq

Over two centuries ago, John Adams spoke eloquently about the need to let facts and evidence guide actions and policies. He said, “Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” Listen to those words again, and you can hear John Adams speaking to us now about Iraq. “Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.”

Tragically, in making the decision to go to war in Iraq, the Bush Administration allowed its wishes, its inclinations and its passions to alter the state of facts and the evidence of the threat we faced from Iraq.

While Steve is surprised to find himself agreeing with Sen. Edward Kennedy, I see another eloquent speech on how the Bush Administration betrayed the American people by using us as a tool to achieve its own ends.

Senator Edward M. Kennedy Delivers Speech to the Council on Foreign Relations (on the Senate’s website)

In the march to war, the President exaggerated the threat anyway. It was not subtle. It was not nuanced. It was pure, unadulterated fear-mongering, based on a devious strategy to convince the American people that Saddam’s ability to provide nuclear weapons to Al Qaeda justified immediate war.

Right on, Senator.

Posted by James at March 7, 2004 5:47 PM
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